Posted in Knitting

A Lacy Day

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– a day when I don’t feel like doing much, so I pick up pins and/or needles and do some lace knitting.

The other day, I made a Cornflower circular block:

Lace Knitting - Cornflower Circular Block

The wool is Lithuanian made Artistic colorway yarn – so lovely – and easy to work with. Lesley Stanfield and Melody Griffiths have a perfect pattern – a variation of a classic easy and simple eyelet circle. So I didn’t have to reinvent the wheel and used their pattern to make the Cornflower.

Then, I swatched an ‘eyelet hearts’ pattern, which can be found on VogueKnitting here, using wool that comes from Raasiku:

Lace Hearts - Lace Knitting

Then, I made another piece of lace hearts fabric and wet-felted it:

Lace Hearts - Lace Knitting - Wet-Felted

The next little project – for another lacy day – making these lace hearts the Estonian way, using Estonian yarn and a pattern in Pitsilised Koekirjad, an Estonian lace knitting book, 2nd edition, by Leily Reimann:

Pitsilised Koerkirjad - Estonian Lace

The pattern is slightly larger, with a multiple of 14 sts and a repeat of 12 rows, techniques are a bit different too, but the overall results, judging by the photo in the book, should be as pretty, if not prettier, as the swatches above 🙂

Oh, and at the top of this post is an attempt to claim my blog on bloglovin, which, allegedly, makes it easier to keep up with updates on our favorite blogs. All I have to do is include the link at the top of my post 🙂

Cheers!

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Posted in Knitting

The Last Straw, Upcycled

I was on a longish flight from point A to point B, with no project to work on, because I checked most of my stuff in an attempt to travel super light. A few minutes into the flight a lady across the isle pulled out her sketchbook and pencils and got to work – how fun! A little while later, another person, right behind her, got her crochet out – what were the odds? Reading the word “blog” on a random car in heavy traffic was sort of the last straw…and here I am 🙂

Speaking of straws, did you know these could make the best stitch markers ever for your knitting, circular or not? I was working on a large piece of lace knitting when one of the padlock-type markers snapped in the middle of the work for no apparent reason and I had no more markers left.  My mind rushed through a number of options, none of which were good enough. Then I found a bright colored straw in a kitchen drawer, which I immediately visualized as a set of perfect tiny round stitch markers slipping easily from one needle to the other. I highly recommend making yourself some of these DIY stitch markers and saving yourself some money and doing good for the environment by upcycling some plastic!!!

Upcycled Straw - DIY Stitch Marker

Additionally, these markers make the job of tracking your stitch count a breeze!!!

DIY Stitch Markers

Here’s my latest lace knitting designing project ‘featuring’ my upcycled straw stitch markers and the stitch count technique 🙂

Lace Knitting with DIY Stitch Markers.jpg

 

The lovely royal blue 2-ply pure (brushed?) wool comes from Lithuania; it’s a bit on a coarse side, but still very pleasant to touch (thankfully, I’m not allergic to this type of fiber). This yarn and the laminated birch circular needles – my new favorite – are a pleasure to work with, even in the summer!  ❤

Posted in Knitting, Yarn

Woolen Treasures

Note to self, and anyone this may resonate with:

Don’t resent change! Go with the flow!!! Get out there and look for gems it has in store for you. Results may more than pleasantly surprise you 🙂

8.2 Art Yarn 1
Loving my scarf to be
8.1 Art Yarn 2
Oh the lovely colors of the heavenly yarn that still smells of soft and fluffy sheep!
8.2 Art Yarn 3
Bouncy ball of pure wool yarn

Happy lace knitting and crocheting to me and to you 🙂

Posted in Knitting

Bohemian Knitting

Literally.

I love this one book of lace knitting designs by Marianne Kinzel. Or, actually, both of her books. I wonder if she had more published… The author-designer was born and learned to knit and design her knits in Bohemia. I am in love with her floral designs. And, her books include both written instructions and symbol charts!

So, I decided to make a wall hanging of a lace knit flower based on her Thistle Design. I got some crochet cotton thread and a set of bamboo double ended knitting needles. I thought I’d complete about 30 rounds or so to get a nice size flower. I know, her design is too majestic to be only partially completed  for a mere purpose of making a wall hanging. But such was my idea. The first 2 dozen rounds worked up beautifully on the tiny bamboo pins, at which point I had to switch to a circular set of needles as the piece was outgrowing the size of my bamboo pins.

Bohemian Knitting 1

I placed the work on a set of these shiny sleek circular needles – I love the color and how smooth they are. Half way into the next round I realized that hadn’t been the best choice for the project. Cotton thread was getting caught on the join between the cord and the needle. This determined the size of my bohemian knit flower:

Bohemian Knitting 2

It’s not the first time that these lovely needles didn’t work with cotton. I’d previously had to unravel my cotton blend hearts:

Lace Hearts

They do work great with acryllic and wool. I have to keep that in mind each time I pick up cotton. They just look so nice and appear to be such a perfect match for cotton thread and yarn that I keep wanting to experiment, hoping that it’ll work better next time.

Well, for my next project, I’ll have to get a set of circular bamboo needles in this particular size. Time and time again, I come to a conclusion that bamboo needles are the best. I still love working with my colorful needles made from different materials, but investing in a complete set of circular ‘bamboo’ of all useful sizes appears to be a must at this point…

Although, I’m not sure if I’d change my mind if I tried a pair of Prym ergonomic knitting needles. I am hoping to figure out the best way to purchase one. I want to see if they work any better. They look super cool and futuristic 🙂