Posted in Crochet, Knitting

Knitting, Knooking, and Crocheting too

My knit and crochet Lucky Lilac scarf is still work in progress. I’ve used up one skein of I Love this Cotton! and I’d like to add about two more:

Lucky Lilac Knit and Crochet Scarf

I really like this pattern, which I picked out to make “imitation” lilac bush/tree leaves.

Speaking of leaf patterns, if you don’t have a stitch collection/dictionary around, such as Barbara Walker’s treasury books, or Harmony guides, or (include your favorite 🙂 ), or Vogue Knitting Stitchitionary publications (see also: http://www.vogueknitting.com/resources/stitchionary), you can find some lovely vintage or antique patterns in books that are in the public domain now. There’s a nice variety of crochet, knitting, tatting, embroidery… books on The Antique Pattern Library – New Media Arts Inc’s project – site (www.antiquepatternlibrary.org), which looks like a great resource listing materials donated by folks from different parts of the world. Per New Media Arts Inc’s website, “Antique Pattern Library is a library of public domain craft publications and patterns, helping ancient crafts survive and allowing everybody, regardless of money, to share in the rich heritage of patterns our ancestors left us. It provides inspiration and tutorials, patterns and philosopies. Much work goes into making the sources useful for crafters, and as a result this maker’s library is appreciated and used worldwide.”

Anyway, where was I, ah right, you can find a nice leaf pattern or two in Antique Pattern Library’s or the Internet Archive’s public domain files:

  • Knitting: How to Knit and What to Knit. Compiled and Edited by Marie Louise Kerzman. – see p.75-76;
  • Kant-Breiwerk naar Oude Patronen door Luoise Thompson en Elis. M. Rogge – see p.66.
  • The Jenny June Series Manuals for Ladies. Knitting and Crochet. A Guide to the Use of the Needle and the Hook. 200 Illustrations. Edited by Jenny June. (see p.71-72…for a nice border pattern).

I bet there’s more too. It’s a pretty amazing collection.

Back to my scarf, when the knitting is complete, I’ll decorate it with my little Lucky Lilac crochet flowers:

Crochet Lucky Lilac

Here’s a quick pattern for the flower, which I’ll chart and share at some point 🙂

Foundation: unfinished slipknot (usk, see image in my blogspot post for details re usk), ch3, sl st in usk to join. Rnd 1: ch1, 10sc around, sl st in 1st sc to join.

Rnd 2: ch4, 3tr closed cluster (chain 3 loop on hook, work 3 incomplete trs in same sc as join – 4 loops on hook, yo, pull through 3 loops – 2 loops on hook, yo, pull through remaining 2 loops to make a closing chain – 3tr closed cluster complete); ch4, sl st in same sc as join. One petal complete.

3tr closed cluster - crochet stitch

(sl st in next sc. In next sc: sl st, ch4, 3tr closed cluster, ch4, sl st) x4; sl st in sl st to join.

I like regular lilacs too – just work 8 sc in Rnd 1 and make 4 petals.

The other day, I felt like doing some knooking, but didn’t have a knooking needle – there happened to be none available in any of the huge craft stores nearby the day I wanted to try knooking, so I ended up using a tunisian crochet hook and a piece of satin cord, which made what I call my perfect DIY knooking needle.

DIY Knooking Needle Experiment

The satin cord was too thin to make the knooking process faster or easier; a thicker cord made too big a knot that would not slide through loops. It was not a speedy process, but the tool did work well enough to satisfy my curiosity about the knooking technique. I’ll be doing more of it once I have an adequate knooking needle.

Cheers!

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Author:

Avid crocheter, amateur pianist, aspiring artist with an interest in world languages. Crochet symbol system - a language more universal than Esperanto :) is my absolute favorite.

6 thoughts on “Knitting, Knooking, and Crocheting too

    1. Oh yes, if you have one of those double end crochet hooks (or a Tunisian crochet hook with a soft and flexible cord attachment, which I don’t have so I used a satin cord), you can do Tunisian crochet, classic crochet, and knooking, which will produce knit-like fabric!

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    1. How good to know you own bamboo knoocks, Ruthie! I was considering getting plastic ones in a couple different sizes, but now, I’m convinced I should go with bamboo. I do love my bamboo knitting needles, each as light as a feather, and super smooth but not too slippy. Thank you so much for the tip! 🙂 ☀️

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